Thursday, August 15

Are courgettes promiscuous?

There I've done it again haven't I? Used a title that will up my hit rate. If you have arrived here expecting something different then it is maybe a sign for you to take up gardening - who knows you may just enjoy it!

Back to our courgettes. We are growing three different varieties which all share the same bed. One is a long green variety - Zucchini, one a long yellow variety - Jemmer and the other a pale green round variety - Tondo Chiaro di Nizza. I think though we have inadvertently developed our own strains.

I can only assume that some cross pollination has taken place as we have some fruits that look like this. 
Is this the result of an illicit union between our yellow and green plants?

And then there is this...
 ... a round fruit is growing on a plant that also has produced a long green fruit (as it should).

The round fruit isn't the same colour as those from Tondo Chiaro di Nizza that is supposed to bear round fruits more the colour of other fruit on the zucchini. Here's a closer view of the two fruits growing on the same plant
Below are two fruits from Tondo - they are a paler colour but have the markings of the rogue fruit.
It would seem that the variety unimaginatively called Zucchini will cross pollinate with anything! I wonder whether the squash plants are up to the same tricks. 




32 comments:

  1. I have nothing quite so exciting happen to my courgettes & I have a couple of varieties this year. How fun for you.

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    1. I'm just starting to wonder what the squash are up to under leaf cover, Jo

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  2. I'm disappointed that mine haven't done anything like this! I still have far too many though. Thank goodness for your courgette suggestions!

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    1. Ours don't seem to be quite as prolific this year. CJ. We are using some in frittatas as well. Hope you find some of the suggestions tasty.

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  3. Gardening always surprises! Interesting..... Unfortunately my courgettes were all eaten by promiscuous slugs!

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    1. Oh dear, Jill those darn slugs strike again.

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  4. I have never had my courgettes do that! But I have had my squashes do some strange things. I am going to sow the seed of one that was huge and had the most amazing sweet flesh and see what I end up with this coming summer.

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    1. It will be interesting to hear what you end up with Sharon.

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  5. How fabulous! I have had it happen to squashes! I had a funny cross between yellow button with a white Italian. I love these sorts of happy garden accidents!

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  6. I've never had anything like this happen to mine before and I usually grow more than one variety. I bet it's fun waiting to see what each plant produces.

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    1. Especially when it is carried out in secrecy under the cover of a mass of leaves, Jo so fruit is just hiding and waiting for an opportunity to surprise.

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  7. That's really interesting! I like the look of the yellow and green courgette.

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    1. I wonder if we took cuttings we could reproduce it, Kelli - maybe not!

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  8. How fascinating! The green and yellow ones look fab. What do they taste like?xxxx

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    1. They just taste of courgette, Snowbird

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  9. Ooer! Never seen that happen before - is that what goes on 'up North' sexual shennanigins!

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    1. Not in our house, Elaine but you've boosted my hit rate again! :D

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  10. It's not the birds, it must be the bees.

    In my case the only cross would be would be between Defender (which is already a cross) and Zucchini. Not very exciting. (But I have plans for squashes next year.)

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    1. What plans are those Mal Crown prince spaghetti?

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  11. Weird! I'm only growing two plants this year, in an attempt to avoid gluts and marrows, both Jemmer. Interestingly, they aren't growing big fast, which suits me down to the ground (no pun intended), and wow they taste good, even raw in salads - what do your weird ones taste like?

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    1. They don't taste any different Janet - our plants don't seem to be growing as many fruits this year

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  12. Quite lucky I think to get round and normal courgettes on one plant, and a little strange. I only planted one this year, glad I did its pumping them out daily! Amanda x

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    1. The orund courgette is growing near the plants with round courgettes so no doubt it's a result of a bit of cross pollination on that flower, Amanda

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  13. I do envy you having Courgettes Sue. The flowers have sadly dropped off of all three of my Courgette Ambassador plants. Our Hunter Squash doesn't have any flowers on at all. Do you think it is it too cold at night for them now ? Marion

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    1. I don't think it has been particularly cold on a night Marion ( our night temperature are between 10C and 13C) so, unless it has been colder where you are which is unlikely, it can't be that - our courgettes haven't as much fruit as last year but the winter squash are better. Are you just getting male flowers? Maybe it is that the plants had a late start as they tend to produce more male flowers earlier in their life.

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  14. Weird! I like the half green half yellow one.

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