Monday, April 10

A busy weekend of planting

Last weekend we were busy making the most of the summer-like weather. I even managed to survive with only one thin jumper.

Some time was spent preparing beds and other general maintenance work but for the most part we were planting. Not that we have a lot to show for it as much of the planting is still below ground.


Another bed of potatoes has been planted through weed control fabric.

The second lot of 'invisible' work was direct sowing of two narrow trenches of Onward peas.
The hazel twigs placed on the bed are to cut down on any animal foot-marks or dust bathing birds disturbing the seeds. It won't deter any hungry mice or weevils though. Once the peas are through - ever hopeful - the twigs will be used as supports.

Shallots, onions and broad beans all planted in module cells have been waiting in the cold frame to be planted out. 
The warm, sunny weather during the last couple of days meant that the broad beans suddenly put on a growth spurt and so they are a bit taller than I would have liked but hopefully - there's that word again - they should soon perk up.
The onions and shallots were at just the right stage for planting - the compost held together and the roots were not yet pot bound. Four varieties of onions and two of shallots were planted.

There was some space left at the end of the rows and so these were planted up with sets. The remaining sets are destined for elsewhere.

Incidentally the autumn planted onions are romping away.
In the greenhouse we have some fairly large brassica plants which could be planted but we are considering potting them into larger pots to build up a stronger root system before surrendering them to the possibility of being struck by club root.

In the greenhouse other seedlings are in early stages of growth.
On the left from the top are, green and red cabbage, rocket, spinach, lettuce and mustard seedlings. Then there are the early brassicas - cabbage, calabrese and cauliflower. On the right are leeks with sweet peas below. The sweet peas seeds were attacked by mice and so there are some gaps in the cells.

I mentioned in my last post that we had a trip to Norwich on Friday. On Thursday we had another trip to Northampton. During Thursday Royal Mail had attempted to leave an order of perennials but instead of leaving them where we requested when ordering, they took them back to the depot. Apparently it is against their rules to leave things. This meant an early morning 5 mile journey to pick up the plants which we then had to carry in the car boot to Norwich and back. As the plants were tiny plugs we had to take a tray and water them before our journey. Had they been left on Thursday we would have had chance to pot them on straight away. We were not happy bunnies.

There are 144 plantlets - too many to pot up individually and so these are being potted in groups of the same variety into largish pots.
These are destined for the perennial bed on the plot.

Just to end, Martyn posted a video that he made of our plot in full blossom. Just in case you missed it I am posting here but be warned as it is 10 minutes long.


We filmed this weekends plot activity too but this is still in the 'editing room'. When it is published we will post it on our video blog.


15 comments:

  1. ooh, so many trays! 'Hopefully' is a very well-used word on our plot too!

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    1. It will be a word much used for several weeks if not months, Belinda.

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  2. Wishing you good luck with the brassicas. They're always one of my most anticipated crops. We don't have a problem with club root---around here its slugs, pill bugs and cutworms. Always something!

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    1. Slugs, cabbage white butterfly caterpillars (I think you call them cabbage worms) and wood pigeons add to the problem, Sue

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  3. How annoying about Royal Mail refusing to leave the plants where you had requested. I hope they are none the worse for their outing in your car boot! I'm surprised to hear you say there were "some gaps" in the trays of Sweet Peas, because when mice arrive they normally scoff everything in sight.

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    1. We were very annoyed, Mark and Royal mail and Suttons have received an email.

      Once we spotted the mouse attack we covered the sweet peas with a propagator lid.

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  4. Don't you just love it when your freshly dug or leveled earth gets a hole in it a few hours later! Thanks for the tip with the sticks, I think I'll cover my carrot sowings with canes

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    1. Straight after sowing carrots we cover with enviromesh to protect from carrot fly, Docky. It then stays on throughout the season

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  5. I'm so impressed! Everything looks grand. I am jealous of your onions. I can't grow them to save my life. You always give such good advice. I appreciate it.

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    1. We all seem to have some crop or other that seems to be beyond us don't we, Bonnie?

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  6. You've been getting so much planting done at your plot. And it looks like your seedlings are doing really well.

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    1. It will now depend whether the slugs home in on the seedlings, Phuong.

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  7. 144 plants - wow! Your gardens seem so full already, I can't imagine where you are putting them all. And it is just so funny that in our very different climates, we are both sowing peas at the same time! I'll be getting mine into the ground this week.

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    1. The plants are for the allotment, Margaret for our cut flower/perennial bed. The plants are tiny at the moment This is our first sowing of peas more will follow.

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  8. How lovely to see all those crops being planted out. It's always such a thrilling time of the year, yea....we all have to hope!!! What a pain having to collect the plants, I'm shaking my head here. I can't play your video, our internet connection is playing up at the moment, hopefully I will be able to see it at some point. I have an awful mouse problem in my greenhouse, it's eaten every single courgette seed and has rummaged in all the other seed trays looking for more, result....total devastation!I now have to re-sow everything. How disappointing!xxx

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