Friday, April 21

Greenhouse update

Past experience has made us cautious gardeners. This means that we often lag behind when it comes to seed sowing. Germinating seeds early isn't a problem but as we don't heat our greenhouse, keeping the seedlings healthy after germination is a problem. We find that seedlings grown later that don't suffer being checked in their growth often catch up with those raised earlier. 

That said you may think that many of the things in our greenhouse at the moment are on the small side but it works for us.

Unlike many we don't sow our sweet peas overwinter nor do we grow them in tall modules but it works  for us to sow seeds in spring in standard modules. Most of our sweet peas are now at the pinching out stage.
We did, however, have one set back in that a mouse or mice decided to raid the seeds as can be seen from the photo above - bottom right. Incredibly some seeds survived but it meant I was missing four varieties and so although it was a bit late to be sowing sweet peas, I bought replacements. Most of the original sweet peas seeds were saved by covering with lids and thwarting the foraging rodents. Lesson learned for the future.
Some seedlings are ready for pricking out top right photos above are various brassicas, lettuce and spinach. On the top left are the leeks which have a bit more growing to do before they move to the plot. The seed trays on the bottom row are mainly sown with flower seeds.

You may remember our well travelled perennials which have now all been planted up in batches and are growing well.
We also have three new dahlias shooting. All of these are destined to live in the recently cleared perennial/cut flower bed at the allotment.

Some plants that have overwintered in the greenhouse are springing back into life. The pelargoniums in the bottom two photos are actually in the summerhouse and not the greenhouse. The top right photos is a delospernum.

One osteospernum is even flowering. In the pot on the right below are osteospernum and verbena.
The other photos show a lavender, a banana that having been cut down is now regrowing, a tub of mint and a fuchsia. All the above will move outside once the danger of frost has passed or at least a keen frost is a less likely event.

We have one bag of potatoes growing in this greenhouse that should produce out first crop. More potato tubs are planted up in the plot greenhouse as well as out on the plot.
The grapevine that if allowed would swallow up the greenhouse now has leaves. It will soon be necessary to curtail its growth.
If you are wondering whether we have still held off sowing tomato seeds, the answer is no. These were sown and placed under the grow lights in a spare bedroom.
We have two of these set ups in which the tomato seedlings have germinated along with aubergines, cucumbers, courgettes, melons and achillea. Still to germinate are peppers, alpine strawberries and some other flower seeds.

I have already posted about the peach, apricot and nectarine trees that live in the greenhouse.



18 comments:

  1. Nothing finer than a greenhouse full of babies. Sorry about the mice-they can be a problem. Do you set traps? If so, they much prefer peanut butter over seedlings.

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    1. We haven't set traps Sue just used preventative measures which helps protect from slug attack too.

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  2. I'm always impressed by the scale of your gardening ventures, Sue - huge in comparison to my modest efforts. I suppose there is a certain amount of safety in numbers, in that it's unlikely that mice will destroy ALL your seeds / seedlings! In my case, the loss of six or seven seeds would be a disaster.

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    1. Your efforts are certainly not modest Mark. Our plots have to rough it on open ground rather than be carefully tended which means we have to grow more. As for not destroying all our seedlings the creatures give it their best shot.

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  3. I don't think you are to late, most people sow seeds or buy plug plants to early, encouraged by the garden centres. My green houses are full and it is too early to put anything out.

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    1. It's true about garden centres, Brian. They sell sacrificial tender plants early so people buy twice as many. We used to have a local family run nursery who refused to sell their plants until the time was right. unfortunately they are now retired

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  4. Everyone has to find the way of doing things that makes the most sense for them and their garden. My tomatoes were just sown over a week ago but it will be at least a couple more weeks before I start the cucumbers and squash.

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    1. It is true, you have to find the ways that work for you, Margaret. Gardening isn't an exact science.

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  5. Your greenhouse is full of seedlings, Sue. They are grown enough, especially pelargonium and potato. I have pelargonium cuttings planted for rooting, hope to have more of them to decorate my garden. Sure you will have tasty tomatoes!

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    1. I may take some pelargonium cuttings, Nadezda,

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  6. Your greenhouse really looks great! You have done a lot of work and everything will grow beautiful!
    I hope you had a wonderful Easter !!
    Happy weekend !

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    1. Thank you Ela, I hope you are having a good weekend too.

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  7. We too are slow among our fellow plotholders, but we still have plenty to eat, with slightly less re-sowing necessary (well, that's the plan!)

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  8. I do enjoy seeing what is going on in your greenhouse. You are ahead of me in all ways. Sorry to hear about your pesky mouse too, they ate all my sweet peas too so I shall have to buy some. Yes....I went down the lid path too and must remember to do that again next spring. My peppers aren't up yet along with many other seeds....xxx

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    1. We will have to make a note to use lids at the start next year, Dina

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  9. The greenhouse is full of baby plants! Soon you will need full swing time to transplant them to the ground! I use "mouse glue" to catch the mouse at my place!

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    1. It's already quite busy, Malar.

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