Saturday, June 10

Battered but possibly not beaten

If you watched Martyn's video in my last post you will have seen that the gales of last week left their mark on our allotment.

On Friday we ventured onto the plot with a degree of trepidation, the main aim to try and ameliorate some of the damage.

We started with the cornflowers. Ironically the previous week a plot neighbour had commented on how lovely they looked swaying in the breeze.  Now they no longer swayed gently but were still full of flower which were being visited by a battalion of bees. Remedial action was decided on and a framework of hazel poles constructed. 
It's hardly a thing of beauty but it will hopefully enable us to continue harvesting some flowers and the bees to continue foraging.

Attention next turned to the outdoor tomatoes. Now these were not prize specimens to start with. They were left over from the best plants chosen for the greenhouses. They had hung around awaiting their fate and consequently were rather leggy.  Although the plants were laying flat the stems were not broken and so I supported them using canes. They will never look brilliant but if they survive the dreaded blight they should provide some fruits.
Initially we thought that the newly planted sweetcorn had been wiped out but, although some of the plants were broken, some had perked up a bit. They look rather tattered but it's possible that some of the plants may still grow.
What do you think?

Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

16 comments:

  1. I think nature has a wonderful way of bouncing back, and with a little help from a few well placed supports all will not be lost.
    Prior to the gales, I tied 'broad bean style' bamboos and string around my more vulnerable plants, but for us it's a case of here it comes again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really need to pre-empt such conditions, Deborah but I always seem to end up doing remedial work.

      Delete
  2. Your hazel supports are much nicer looking than the impromptu supports that I usually end up using. They are pretty in a rustic way. And all those flowers are definitely worth saving. Do the gales commonly blow like that at this time of year?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The problem is getting the hazel poles into the ground, Michelle as the ground is so hard. We do get trong winds in summer but the difference with this last lot was that it was more prolonged.

      Delete
  3. Oh I like your hazel supports Sue and the cornflowers look quite happy too. Happier that mine did when I saw them yesterday - they have been severely munched:( The jury is out as to whether it was rabbit or pigeon. I don't think it was mollusc damage but could be wrong. The same happened last year but the plants put on new growth. I think that with continued tlc your tomatoes and sweetcorn will live to tell the tale.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strange as nothing bothered the cornflowers, Anna. I wonder if your problem was a rabbit as that is one pest we don't have to contend with YET!

      Delete
  4. I'm fed up with this windy weather! Can't believe it's still windy today too! Your hazel is definitely prettier than our plastic netting, but, as you say, the bees are still enjoying the flowers and our valerian still looks nice... from a distance!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's been windy here again today too, Belinda

      Delete
  5. I inadvertently stepped on one of my sweetcorn plants last year and partially crushed the stem. I thought it was a gonner but decided to give it a chance with a stake to support it. Against all the odds it pulled through. Sweetcorn are tough!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jessica you have given me hope.

      Delete
  6. If the stems stayed intact that's a good sign - the tomatoes don't look that bad actually. So long as you don't have a repeat storm in the near future, I have a feeling that things will bounce back.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's been windy again today, Margaret but not as bad. I hope your feeling is correct.

      Delete
  7. Our local horticultural suppliers has almost sold out of canes in the last few days!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess it's a case of what doesn't kill the plants will make them stronger. Rick

      Delete
  8. What a beautiful flowers they have!
    Hope the corns grow well! The tomatoes too! ;)

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for visiting and leaving a comment - it is great to hear from you and know that there are people out there actually reading what I write! Come back soon.
(By the way any comments just to promote a commercial site, or any comments not directly linked to the theme of my blog, will be deleted)
I am getting quite a lot of spam. It isnot published and is just deleted. I have stopped sifting through it and just delete any that ends up in my spam folder in one go so I am sorry if one of your messages is deleted accidentally.
Comments to posts over five days old are all moderated.