Tuesday, May 13

Magnolia - Takeover bid

As I posted earlier the magnolia begins to flower before any leaves appear. Then follows a steady transition as petals fall and the leave begin to appear. Gradually the leaves take over as a wave of green steadily sweeps across the tree.
The seed pods resemble a pine cone after a squirrel has made a meal of the seeds.
Each green 'bud' is a potential seed case. I say potential as I don't think our tree will produce seeds - I've never noticed any forming before but I will be watching closely this year. Each of the green seed cases start off with a brown curled tail that gradually withers. Maybe this is the remains of the pistil.
The leaves are the fresh vibrant green of new leaves. 
They are also soft and thin allowing light to pass through.
As the leaves absorb sunlight they become a stronger shade of green. I think this is because of a build up of chlorophyll - the pigment that causes leaves to be green. (I say think as I can't find any information to confirm this). The flimsier leaves allows sunlight to reach the leaves lower down the tree.


We still have one or two magnolia flowers but they will soon fade and the leaf canopy will thicken and cast dense shade onto the ground below which is why we devote this are to spring flowers.

For now a few flowers remain. I must admit I have been surprised by the length of the flowering period which if asked, before I kept a close watch on the tree, I would have said was over in one or two weeks.

Copyright: Original post from Our Plot at Green Lane Allotments http://glallotments.blogspot.co.uk/ author S Garrett

18 comments:

  1. Although the flowering period will over, but the green canopy will come and give you new freshness

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    1. I does change the whole are beneath the tree once it leafs up, Endah It's not as easy to spot the birds either.

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  2. I am struggling with a new plot of clay, bind weed and couch grass and have at times recently felt like giving up. Your post reminds me that I just need to keep going and one day it will be easier and more productive. Thanks for the timely reminder :)

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    1. Welcome BG, You have had poor conditions, - once the weather dries the soil a bit maybe things will be a little easier.
      See this page on my website for how one of our plots looked before clearing. I've had a quick look at your blog but will have a better read later

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  3. They do seem to have lasted longer this year, I don't have one but there is one in a garden close by to me. It still has flowers now, I shall look out for the seed pods, I've never noticed them before.

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    1. It will be interesting to check the flowering period another year, Jo. I am now on the lookout for seeds!

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  4. I've really noticed the magnolias in surrounding gardens and when I'm out and about this year, they have seemed to flower for longer, or perhaps I just haven't noticed them before. We're losing our local garden centre, I thought the closure of Swillington might have directed more business to it, but its part of the Strikes group (though it isn't named Strikes) and there's another one only a mile or so away so perhaps it's not viable anymore. I can see we're going to have to trail when we want something now.

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    1. We bought the magnolia from Swillington. Is it the Strikes on the dual carriageway that is closing?

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    2. No, that one's staying open, though I had heard that it was closing a while ago. The one that's closing is Saville's up on the cliff. It's part of the Strikes group. I wonder if they'll be selling anything off.

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    3. Must admit I've never been keen on Savilles

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  5. I wonder how long a seed would take to become a viable tree? Your magnolia is a true beauty, I really must get one.xxx

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    1. I doubt that I'll find out, Snowbird. I don't expect viable seeds.

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  6. I love magnolias even when they're not in flower, the smooth branches and luxurious foliage always look good. I put a little one in the front garden but it's not looking good at all. Some tiny green strips that look like they were supposed to be leaves, but they've been there for ages and done nothing. I'm keeping my fingers crossed, but I have to say I think it might be the beginning of the end. What do I do to things?!

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    1. Fingers crossed for your little plant, CJ.

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  7. Such a pretty flowers which I can't have't here in my garden!

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    1. But you have so many equally gorgeous flowers, Malar that wouldn't survive with us.

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  8. There's a rather lovely magnolia at the front of the flats; most of the flowers finished weeks back but just a few days ago I noticed two flowers that are clinging on - so lovely to see!

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    1. There always seems to be a few that come late to the party, Caro

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